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How The 2021 Ford F-150 Raptor Lines Up

The 2021 Ford F-150 Raptor is a completely new car built on the redesigned Ford F-150 chassis that was unveiled earlier this year. Many of the new Raptor's convenience features are shared with the previous F-150, such as an inbuilt transportable generator and the load-lugging capabilities. It's the most serious off-roader in the range, capable of some genuinely amazing feats. The inside and exterior are both new, however the engine and transmission are not. Read on to find out more about exactly how this car lines up and how it could be the new standard for 4x4 vehicle builds

Exterior Of The F-150 Raptor

There are some differences between the new F-150 Raptor and the older F-150. This is mainly down to the F-150 SuperCrew and even includes the hood bulges. On top of this, there are LED headlights, a blacked-out grille, and heat extractor vents on the vehicle’s sides. Unlike some models, these vents actually work. In fact, it almost looks as though the vents were inspired by the F-22 fighter plane, and although the Ford F150 Raptor isn't quite in that league, these additions do give the car a good sense of uniqueness; perfect for a custom build

Then there are the options you can choose from if you decided that the F-150 Raptor was the perfect choice for you. They include blacked-out taillights, and not one but three 17 inch options when it comes to the rims.

The most significant visible difference between the regular F-150 and the Raptor is the track width, and it's a fairly sizable one. To make the most of its powerful engine and revolutionary suspension system, the Raptor demands a wide footprint. These aren’t the only changes because it seems as though Ford also listened to drivers, adding fog lights and additional off-road lights pre-wired to the first auxiliary switch to the list of possible choices.

Interior Of The Raptor

Again, the interior of the Raptor doesn’t, at first glance, at least, look overly dissimilar to the F-150. Of course, what it does have is most of the optional extras from the F-150 as standard in the Raptor, making it a much more high-end model than you might expect. There are also some flourishes that are only to be found on the Raptor, making it that little bit special.

You’ll be pleased to hear that the build quality is excellent, and the front row has nicely cushioned power-adjustable seats as standard, ensuring a comfortable ride. Visibility is vital in a truck like this, but technology makes all the difference. A 12-inch digital instrument cluster, ambient lighting, and a 12-inch center infotainment screen are standard on the Raptor. It creates a high-tech atmosphere that blends with older switchgear, such as roof-mounted auxiliary toggle switches.

The steering wheel is particularly noticeable. It has lovely orange contrast stitching, metal paddles, and a 12 o'clock pointer. 

F-150 Raptor Dimensions 

If you’re a fan of the SuperCrew Styleside, you’ll be reasonably familiar with the Raptor wheelbase, since the vehicles share the same one. This is a wheelbase of 145.5 inches, and a 5.5-footbed.

As for the rest of the truck, it measures 232.6 inches long, 79.8 inches high, and 86.6 inches wide, excluding the mirrors. With the mirrors, the measurements shoot up to 96 inches. With the high-output engine and upgraded suspension, it weighs 5,740 pounds (5,886 pounds with the optional 37-inch tires). The height increases to 80.7 inches if you use 37-inch tires. As previously established, the Raptor is far wider than a standard vehicle. The front track is 74 inches long, while the rear track is 73.6 inches long. In standard form, their measurements are 67.9/68.5 inches.

Even when compared to the Tremor off-road variant, the Raptor has unequaled off-road performance. With a ground clearance of 12 inches, the approach, breakover, and departure angles are 31 degrees, 22.7 degrees, and 23.9 degrees, respectively. When the massive tires are installed, the stats rise even higher, hitting 33.1/24.4/24.9 degrees with 13.1 inches of clearance.

F-150 Raptor Off Roading Performance 

We’ve mentioned the previous F-150 a number of times in this review, and that’s because many of the same details are used. That includes the 3.5L EcoBoost V6 engine. There really was no reason to change this, especially when you consider how great its performance is; this engine won Le Mans, after all. Yet some might argue that it’s still not quite powerful enough to manage the bulk of the Raptor. The engine has 510 lb-ft of torque with 450 horsepower, yet it can often feel lackluster. This is even more apparent when you consider that the Ram 1500 TRX has over 700 horsepower, just as an example. Having said that, we all know that it's not always about how much power you have, but how much of it you can control.

The Raptor's towing capability is lower than that of a conventional F-150 due to its unique suspension and tire arrangement. It can only pull 8,200 lbs, although other F-150 variants can haul up to 14,000 lbs. It's worth mentioning that the towing capacity has increased by 200 pounds compared to the previous model, as has the payload capacity of 1,400 pounds. The TRX can only pull 8,100 pounds and carry 1,310 pounds.

The Raptor is only available in 4WD, although it's a part-time system with 2H, 4H, low-range, and a 4A mode. Instead of the customary 50:50 split in 4H, the latter may divide torque between the front and rear axles. Essentially, 4A is used for severe off-road drifts.


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